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stoker [2011/01/01 14:06]
historian
stoker [2011/01/01 14:10] (current)
historian
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 <box 80% center round blue> Webmaster'​s Note: The following continues the Pilot'​s story but does not apply to the USS King (DLG-10) history. </​box>​ <box 80% center round blue> Webmaster'​s Note: The following continues the Pilot'​s story but does not apply to the USS King (DLG-10) history. </​box>​
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 +===== Kaman Aircraft Factory, 1966-1967 =====
  
 My return home started another new beginning for me. The navy had been working with the Kaman Aircraft factory and agreed that we needed a helicopter for rescue with more power. The new plans were to do a modification to the UH-2A/B and make a twin engine helicopter that would be designated the UH-2C Sea Spirit. I had now received my promoted to Lt Cdr. and my new assignment was to be the fleet project officer for the development for the new UH-2C. I made many trips from HC-1 at NAF Imperial Beach to the main Kaman factory in Bloomfield, Connecticut. In early 1967, I went TDY to NAS Pax River, the Navy Test Center, where they had placed the first prototype UH-2C. I was to be the fleet pilot to fly with the test pilots through a Board of Inspection Survey, (BIS) which would qualify the helicopter for fleet operations. My first couple of test flights that were flown with the Navy test pilots, were unbelievable. One of the test pilots started one of the engines while I was still doing the pre-flight on the rotor head. After that I went to the Capt. in charge of the BIS program and related my experience with his test pilots, and told him I refused to fly with them. The next day he called me into his office and gave me a letter designating me the official test pilot for the entire program. Two weeks later I stopped the program as I had been out flying a profile flight and developed severe tail rotor vibrations. When I returned to the flight line and inspected the tail rotor the bearings had disintegrated. They brought the engineers in from the Kaman and agreed that it was a major problem and a new tail rotor would have to be developed. I returned to HC-1 and Kaman began the development of a new tail rotor. It took almost 3 months to get this completed. In the mean time the navy had decided they wanted to deploy the first Detachment on the USS Ranger, which was to deploy in November 1967. They had also designated me to be the Officer-in-charge of that detachment. My return home started another new beginning for me. The navy had been working with the Kaman Aircraft factory and agreed that we needed a helicopter for rescue with more power. The new plans were to do a modification to the UH-2A/B and make a twin engine helicopter that would be designated the UH-2C Sea Spirit. I had now received my promoted to Lt Cdr. and my new assignment was to be the fleet project officer for the development for the new UH-2C. I made many trips from HC-1 at NAF Imperial Beach to the main Kaman factory in Bloomfield, Connecticut. In early 1967, I went TDY to NAS Pax River, the Navy Test Center, where they had placed the first prototype UH-2C. I was to be the fleet pilot to fly with the test pilots through a Board of Inspection Survey, (BIS) which would qualify the helicopter for fleet operations. My first couple of test flights that were flown with the Navy test pilots, were unbelievable. One of the test pilots started one of the engines while I was still doing the pre-flight on the rotor head. After that I went to the Capt. in charge of the BIS program and related my experience with his test pilots, and told him I refused to fly with them. The next day he called me into his office and gave me a letter designating me the official test pilot for the entire program. Two weeks later I stopped the program as I had been out flying a profile flight and developed severe tail rotor vibrations. When I returned to the flight line and inspected the tail rotor the bearings had disintegrated. They brought the engineers in from the Kaman and agreed that it was a major problem and a new tail rotor would have to be developed. I returned to HC-1 and Kaman began the development of a new tail rotor. It took almost 3 months to get this completed. In the mean time the navy had decided they wanted to deploy the first Detachment on the USS Ranger, which was to deploy in November 1967. They had also designated me to be the Officer-in-charge of that detachment.
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 Additional Note: The crack in the rotor brake disc was now a risk problem and a new disc had to be developed. Prior to the arrival of the new rotor brake discs, one of the UH-2C’s from the USS Kitty Hawk was on a flight from Clark AFB to Manila, PI. crashed and all onboard were killed. It was determined in the investigation that the rotor brake disc failed. Pieces flew into the rotor system, causing a main rotor blade to separate from the helo. Helicopters do not fly with one blade missing. It is called an out of balance situation and the whole rotor system departs the craft!!!!!!! ​ Additional Note: The crack in the rotor brake disc was now a risk problem and a new disc had to be developed. Prior to the arrival of the new rotor brake discs, one of the UH-2C’s from the USS Kitty Hawk was on a flight from Clark AFB to Manila, PI. crashed and all onboard were killed. It was determined in the investigation that the rotor brake disc failed. Pieces flew into the rotor system, causing a main rotor blade to separate from the helo. Helicopters do not fly with one blade missing. It is called an out of balance situation and the whole rotor system departs the craft!!!!!!! ​
 +
 +===== USS Ranger (CVA-61), 1967-1968 =====
  
 Within the next few weeks we had to deploy on the USS Ranger (CVA-61), which was home ported at the Alameda Naval Station, in San Francisco. In order to make the full deployment I still needed one more UH-2C, which the following week I flew back to Kaman and picked it up. We were being pressured to make this all happen, so to try to expedite I made a record flight time from the Kaman to Imperial Beach. I drew a straight line on the map and flew as close to that route as possible and still find refueling stations. We made the flight in 19.1 hours of flight time, spending only one night in Amarillo. TX. We made 3 training deployments on CVA-61 out of Alameda and made plans for out departure in November 1967. I took the family to Wyoming for a 2 week vacation prior to my leaving for a 9 month cruise. While we were there we received a phone call from the Adoption agency we had been working with to try to adopt a child. They had baby girl for us but we had to pick her up in 2 days. We left almost immediately and collected out new daughter Darrete. ​ Within the next few weeks we had to deploy on the USS Ranger (CVA-61), which was home ported at the Alameda Naval Station, in San Francisco. In order to make the full deployment I still needed one more UH-2C, which the following week I flew back to Kaman and picked it up. We were being pressured to make this all happen, so to try to expedite I made a record flight time from the Kaman to Imperial Beach. I drew a straight line on the map and flew as close to that route as possible and still find refueling stations. We made the flight in 19.1 hours of flight time, spending only one night in Amarillo. TX. We made 3 training deployments on CVA-61 out of Alameda and made plans for out departure in November 1967. I took the family to Wyoming for a 2 week vacation prior to my leaving for a 9 month cruise. While we were there we received a phone call from the Adoption agency we had been working with to try to adopt a child. They had baby girl for us but we had to pick her up in 2 days. We left almost immediately and collected out new daughter Darrete. ​