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Offline fredw

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Re: Da Nang
« Reply #58 on: January 11, 2011, 20:02:38 PM »
A MSO is a smaller ship designed and built to work with mines. They had very limited self defense capabilities. The radar they had was more for navigation then antiaircraft. they we not equipped to take on a shore battery. Which at one point the King did do. The weapons of the King were far superior because that is  the type of thing the King was designed for.
Fred Wright

Offline grampron

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Re: Da Nang
« Reply #57 on: January 11, 2011, 18:25:58 PM »
Fred, this may sound stupid but why would a MSO need an escort? Wouldn't they put mines in the river and harbors to sink the ships? I just don't get this whole idea of war and strarergy it takes to win or lose, but I REALLY APPRECIATE all the time you take to help me get the concept.

Offline fredw

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Re: Da Nang
« Reply #56 on: January 08, 2011, 21:05:10 PM »
Some of those place would have been to small and shallow for the DLG so they would remain at sea. They would some times go to the Philippines.
Fred Wright

Offline grampron

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Re: Da Nang
« Reply #55 on: January 08, 2011, 18:30:11 PM »
Thank you for furthering my education. I'm going to try to get in touch and found out if the dlg followed the MSO into the harbors and if not where would they link up?

Offline fredw

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Re: Da Nang
« Reply #54 on: January 08, 2011, 12:01:09 PM »
I am going to do a lot of guessing so anyone out there should feel free to correct anything I say here. An MSO is a much smaller ship than the King and as such would normally pull in to dock from time to time in the harbors of Vietnam. By doing so they fall into the class of ships often referred to as "brown water ships".
Magnetic mines were suspended from anchors so they would come close to the hull of any ship passing without being visible. I believe bottom sampling was for the acoustic mines that simply laid on the ocean floor until the noise from a propeller set them off.
You would really have to ask an MSO sailor.
 ;)
Fred Wright

Offline grampron

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Re: Da Nang
« Reply #53 on: January 08, 2011, 11:29:44 AM »
The USS King escorted the USS Inflict to do environmental bottom samplingsand magnetic observations. I understand (I think)  magnetic for mines but why and how for environmental bottom samplings? How close do you have to be to do this to shoreline? Why  then did they do this? I noticed that Senator AKaka list also has the USS Inflict listed on "brown water list.

Offline grampron

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Re: Da Nang
« Reply #52 on: January 06, 2011, 20:32:01 PM »
 This is for Mark D. and Fred W.



From inchop on 24 October 1972 until the commencement of 30 day's duty as MIDSAR picket on 14 December 1972, KING demonstrated her versatility assuming eight changes in task unit assignment ranging from CTU 77.0.4 as MIDSAR Picket to CTU 75.6.1 for Naval Gunfire Support in MR II.


After arrival Subic Bay, an initial WESTPAC inport period of only 2 days provided the bare minimum of time for installation of both WESTPAC pool and special project equipments. On 29 October KING departed Subic for the Gulf of Tonkin to assume duties as AAW escort and logistics support ship for USS INFLICT (MSO-456) serving as CTU 77.0.5 for the operations. KING escorted INFLICT on an Environmental Survey of the coastal waters of North Vietnam for three days during which INFLICT conducted both magnetic observations and bottom samplings at selected points.

Now why in the world would a GLD/10 be needed to help conduct this kind of test and if nothing was in the water why would they risk the lives of sailors to do this test in the first place ?







After reporting for duty withTG75.9 at Pt. Allison on the northern MR I gunline later On 11 December, KING's single 5"54 mount fired 994 rounds in 48 hours including 275 rounds in one 8 hour period. Two ammo VERTREPS were conducted during this hectic gunline tour. On completion of her NGFS assignment on 13 December, KING had fired 1636 rounds of Naval Gunfire Support during the deployment, a total believed to be the highest for DLG-type ships in the Vietnam War. These two gunline periods constituted the first time that KING?s guns have ever been fired in combat. During this time that KING on two separate occasions, came under fire from a coastal defense site and returned over 20 rounds of counter-battery fire for which she was awarded the Combat Action Ribbon.

All this information from USS King History Site. Now the last statement proves that sailors on the USS King December of 1972 earned the Combat Action Ribbon, which makes it easier to get PTSD and to also combat illness, am I right or wrong?











Offline grampron

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Re: Da Nang
« Reply #51 on: January 05, 2011, 20:57:53 PM »
The Da Nang Report about the airport cleanup was from Yahoo News via computer on 01/04/11 and the address for the that I gave for the https://www.rmda.army.mil/organization/jsrrc.shtml/ is for Joint Services Records Research Center( Records Management and Declassification Agency. If it comes up security certificate just push on threw. Best of Luck to those who are fighting to AO,  PTSD service connected.

Offline grampron

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Re: Da Nang
« Reply #50 on: January 04, 2011, 14:16:24 PM »
Thanks,  Fred W. now all we need is the proof the USS King was in Da Nang Harbor? Because it's a 3 sided harbor , inlet, bay, gulf. Ron just found out that his AO case has been reopened.

Offline fredw

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Re: Da Nang
« Reply #49 on: January 04, 2011, 09:44:45 AM »
I have made a Washington National Records Center, request for the following dates.
Gulf of Tonkin    11/1/71   to   1/3/72
Gulf of Tonkin    11/5/72   to   11/28/72
Gulf of Tonkin    12/11/72   to   1/15/73
Gulf of Tonkin    2/9/73   to   2/12/73
Gulf of Tonkin    2/23/73   to   2/27/73
Gulf of Tonkin    3/19/73   to   3/31/73
I will share any info I get.
 :) Fred
Fred Wright

Offline grampron

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Re: Da Nang
« Reply #48 on: January 03, 2011, 14:58:46 PM »
Agent Orange cleanup to start at former US base in Vietnam
Thu Dec 30, 10:25 am ET
 
.HANOI (AFP) ? Vietnam and the United States aim to start cleaning up contamination from Agent Orange at a former wartime US base in the middle of next year, the US embassy said Thursday.

A memorandum signed between the two sides "confirms the mutual desire of both governments to cooperate in hopes that cleanup can begin in July 2011 and be completed in October 2013," the statement said.

The agreement covers contamination at the Danang airport in central Vietnam.

During the Vietnam War US aircraft flying from bases including Danang sprayed Agent Orange and other herbicides to strip trees of foliage, in a bid to deprive communist forces of cover and food.

The herbicides contained potentially cancer-causing dioxin.

In preparation for the cleanup, the US awarded a contract late last year for building a secure landfill site to hold contaminated soil and sediment at the airport, where the US is focusing its help at Vietnam's request.

US ambassador Michael Michalak told the signing ceremony on Thursday that Washington has set aside almost 17 million dollars this year for the Danang dioxin cleanup, which will cost a total of 34 million dollars.

"The two governments are now jointly preparing for the design, procurement and implementation of the project," he said.

Experts have identified two other former US air bases as "hot spots" of dioxin contamination.

The UN this year announced a five-million-dollar project to reduce contamination at the Bien Hoa airport hot spot near Ho Chi Minh City.

A Vietnamese doctor testified before the US Congress this year that more than three million Vietnamese have suffered the effects of wartime herbicides.

Vietnam and the US normalised relations 15 years ago.


Offline grampron

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Re: Da Nang
« Reply #47 on: January 03, 2011, 14:16:41 PM »
I have written everyone that it was suggested I do, now what just wait for the information or is there anything else I should do? Once again WE appreciate and thanks to everyone who took out their precious time to help us.

Offline grampron

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Re: Da Nang
« Reply #46 on: January 03, 2011, 12:33:52 PM »
Another question I have is there any KEYS WORDS I should include when I writing these places?

Offline grampron

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Re: Da Nang
« Reply #45 on: December 30, 2010, 17:33:29 PM »
A change of pace what's the difference between mid watch and shipmate?

Offline grampron

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Re: Da Nang
« Reply #44 on: December 28, 2010, 21:51:31 PM »
Thank you that will be greatly appreciaed.