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Author Topic: Da Nang  (Read 146256 times)

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Offline grampron

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Re: Da Nang
« Reply #103 on: February 12, 2011, 22:22:02 PM »
Mark D, I'm so very SORRY if I offended you, I didn't realize you are the one who publishes all the information about the USS King. I was just thinking maybe the government had grants or scholarships to help with the history of the USS King. Seems like the government has money for everything else. I tried to use the mapsite you gave but of course I don't get it.  Thanks for trying to help.

Offline Mark D

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Re: Da Nang
« Reply #102 on: February 12, 2011, 07:06:29 AM »
Mark D, Do you think you can explain longitudes and latitudes in away I can understand. I would like to where the USS King was moving and if there any other chance in plotting their course? I have DaNang Harbor at 21o01'N, 105o52'E. Can you tell I didn't pay attention during when degrees, long.and lat. were taught.

The easiest way to find a point is using online mapping services like this one:

http://itouchmap.com/latlong.html

FC1(SW), WF / CF Division, 1986 - 1990
USS King (DLG-10/DDG-41) Association Historian

Offline Mark D

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Re: Da Nang
« Reply #101 on: February 12, 2011, 06:43:18 AM »
Don't want to sound ungrateful BUT can anyone explain why the USS Joseph Strauss DDG16 has a complete set of their Vietnam Deck Logs on CD for sale and the USS King doesn't?

It's simply a matter of money. The complete deck logs from 1960 through 1974 will cost $5,295.75. It is estimated that the logs from 1977 to 1991 will cost approximately the same amount, bringing the total to somewhere around $10,000. This does not account for the additional costs to scan the paper copies and the microfilm copies to disk. The USS King Association simply does not have that much money.

Most of the times when you see that another ships association has something like that, it's usually because somebody donated money specifically for that. We do not have that luxury.

If someone wants to donate the money for the specific task of getting all the deck logs, I would be more than happy to make that happen.
FC1(SW), WF / CF Division, 1986 - 1990
USS King (DLG-10/DDG-41) Association Historian

Offline grampron

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Re: Da Nang
« Reply #100 on: February 11, 2011, 18:42:40 PM »
Don't want to sound ungrateful BUT can anyone explain why the USS Joseph Strauss DDG16 has a complete set of their Vietnam Deck Logs on CD for sale and the USS King doesn't?

Offline grampron

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Re: Da Nang
« Reply #99 on: February 10, 2011, 19:50:05 PM »
Mark D, Do you think you can explain longitudes and latitudes in away I can understand. I would like to where the USS King was moving and if there any other chance in plotting their course? I have DaNang Harbor at 21o01'N, 105o52'E. Can you tell I didn't pay attention during when degrees, long.and lat. were taught.

Offline grampron

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Re: Da Nang
« Reply #98 on: February 10, 2011, 19:03:48 PM »
We have a DAV rep from Loma Linda VA Hospital and you know the old saying "If you CAN'T say anything Nice DO'T say anything" applies very nicely here. Now we go to the Los Angeles Regional Office, so we shall see how that works out. Thanks for asking. I forgot to signout, so I couldn't email but I did try yesterday.

Offline kayo1952

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Re: Da Nang
« Reply #97 on: February 09, 2011, 11:34:36 AM »
hey grampron do you have a service officer helping with your claim?you should get one  either through the DAV or VFW they can be a big help. :)

Offline grampron

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Re: Da Nang
« Reply #96 on: February 09, 2011, 06:52:43 AM »
I heard back from ebenefits and they are reassigning my case back to my regional office. I actually think that was pretty quick from all my dumbness.

Offline grampron

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Re: Da Nang
« Reply #95 on: February 07, 2011, 19:27:32 PM »
I forgot to put case number on DA NANG Harbor proof, so I went to ebenefits.va.gov to have the regional put it on. I don't know how well it will work. I'll let you know

Offline grampron

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Re: Da Nang
« Reply #94 on: February 04, 2011, 19:27:37 PM »
Just got my reply back from "Joint Services Records Research Center" "Our office is not a record repository. We do not maintain Unit Histories, Official Military Personnel Files(OMPF's , Morning Reports (MRs) Daily Staff Journals(DJs) or Deck Logs. To obtain copies of unit histories write :
         Naval Historical and Heritage Command( NHHC)
         805 Kidder Breese Street  S.E.
         Washington Navy Yard
         Washington D.C. 20374-5060

         DECK LOGS :
         NARA
         NNR2 Room 2600
         8601 Adelphi Road
         College Park, Maryland   20740

Offline grampron

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Re: Da Nang
« Reply #93 on: February 04, 2011, 14:16:29 PM »
Has there been any testing done on Tonkin Bay water or DA Bang water? We already know they're spending about  17 millions to help clean-up the DaNang airport area ( which the VA is contaminated) but we all know it is. Why isn't the VA spending 17 million to take care of the damage they did the their military personnel. Why isn't the VA declaring service men and women "Hot Spots" and cleaning up their contaminated LIVES.

Offline Mark D

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Re: Da Nang
« Reply #92 on: February 04, 2011, 08:57:05 AM »
I'm just curious was there any ship ever tested after comic back to home port for AO? I 'm missing a point if you service connected for having a picnic why is it so hard to get connected for mail runs or being in water for 38 minutes?

I couldn't be certain, but I don't believe they realized the extent of the effects at the time. I don't think they really had any reason to test the ships.

We're talking about the same people who didn't realize that slapping goggles on GI's and making them watch nuclear weapons detonate 20 years earlier was a bad idea either.

As to why so hard to make connections? My guess is money. The costs for covering these vets comes from the VA's budget and the accountants are probably too far disconnected from these cases to see the real horrors these vets have to endure.

What we need is publicity because I don't believe the general public knows this problem exists. Most people still believe the assumed exposure applies to all, including Blue Water vets.
FC1(SW), WF / CF Division, 1986 - 1990
USS King (DLG-10/DDG-41) Association Historian

Offline grampron

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Re: Da Nang
« Reply #91 on: February 04, 2011, 07:05:15 AM »
I'm just curious was there any ship ever tested after comic back to home port for AO? I 'm missing a point if you service connected for having a picnic why is it so hard to get connected for mail runs or being in water for 38 minutes?

Offline Mark D

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Re: Da Nang
« Reply #90 on: February 04, 2011, 05:40:13 AM »
Went to www.hullnumber.com/dlg10 and found this if anyone interested." The guided missile frigate operated off the West Coast until heading back for the Western Pacific 26 May 1966. On this cruise she carried a helicopter for search and rescue missions to save American pilots during strikes against North Vietnam. She arrived Da Nang South Vietnam 27 June. During July she saved five downed aviators including one who was rescued from deep within North Vietnam by the ship's daring helicopter crew. In August the ship was stationed in a positive identification and radar advisory zone (PIRAZ) in the Gulf of Tonkin to help protect American ships from enemy aircraft. Before she was relieved she had checked over 15 000 aircraft. During this duty she also rescued seven pilots whose planes had gone down during strikes against enemy targets. She continued this duty except for brief runs to Hong Kong and Subic Bay until relieved by Long Beach (CGN-9) on 29 November". Now why didn't this already qualify the USS King for "Brown Water"?

The first thing you'll have to remember is that even if King qualified as operating in Brown Water in 1966, that doesn't mean that qualification extends to her entire operational life, but only during that 1966 time frame. For example, the USS Mahan (DLG-11) is only covered from October 24 through 28, 1964.

As far as that entry from HullNumber.com, there is no specific reference to brown water operations. SAR, PIRAZ, and helo rescue operations were carried out while the ship was quite a distance from shore. The UH-2A helicopters used had a range of almost 600 nautical miles which meant the King could have been more than 100 miles from shore and still launched that helo deep into enemy territory.

That being said, I have given copies of the deck logs from that particular cruise to King crew members seeking disability claims. The ships port call to Danang was no more involved than Rons. I never found out if those claims were successful or not.
FC1(SW), WF / CF Division, 1986 - 1990
USS King (DLG-10/DDG-41) Association Historian

Offline grampron

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Re: Da Nang
« Reply #89 on: February 03, 2011, 19:50:44 PM »
 Went to www.hullnumber.com/dlg10 and found this if anyone interested." The guided missile frigate operated off the West Coast until heading back for the Western Pacific 26 May 1966. On this cruise she carried a helicopter for search and rescue missions to save American pilots during strikes against North Vietnam. She arrived Da Nang South Vietnam 27 June. During July she saved five downed aviators including one who was rescued from deep within North Vietnam by the ship's daring helicopter crew. In August the ship was stationed in a positive identification and radar advisory zone (PIRAZ) in the Gulf of Tonkin to help protect American ships from enemy aircraft. Before she was relieved she had checked over 15 000 aircraft. During this duty she also rescued seven pilots whose planes had gone down during strikes against enemy targets. She continued this duty except for brief runs to Hong Kong and Subic Bay until relieved by Long Beach (CGN-9) on 29 November". Now why didn't this already qualify the USS King for "Brown Water"?