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Mark D
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« Reply #147 on: March 03, 2011, 19:05:28 PM »

Mark or Chuck when and why did the USS King receive the Bronze Star?

The King was never awarded the Bronze Star - it's a personal award, not a unit award:

The Bronze Star Medal (or BSM) is a United States Armed Forces individual military decoration that may be awarded for bravery, acts of merit, or meritorious service.

The Valor device (or "V device") is authorized by all services and identifies the award as resulting from an act of combat heroism (as in the case of the Army and Air Force) or signifying that the medal was earned in combat (as in the case of the Navy), thus distinguishing it from meritorious achievement awards.
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grampron
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« Reply #146 on: March 03, 2011, 18:55:35 PM »

Mark or Chuck when and why did the USS King receive the Bronze Star?
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Mark D
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« Reply #145 on: March 03, 2011, 16:06:31 PM »

Mark D how many other items have you written I just xtime line and haven't had the opportunity to use it yet. Looks kind of complicated tho,so don't be surprised if I have my questions. What other articles have you written about the USS King?

Chuck White (the webmaster) and I have written and compiled many things over the years. Here's where you can find everything:

http://www.uss-king.com/about.shtml

http://uss-king.com/KingWiki/doku.php

http://uss-king.com/smf/index.php/board,13.0.html

http://uss-king.com/smf/index.php/board,18.0.html

http://uss-king.com/smf/index.php/board,16.0.html

Feel free to ask as many questions as you like!
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grampron
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« Reply #144 on: March 03, 2011, 13:48:18 PM »

Mark D how many other items have you written I just xtime line and haven't had the opportunity to use it yet. Looks kind of complicated tho,so don't be surprised if I have my questions. What other articles have you written about the USS King?
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grampron
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« Reply #143 on: February 28, 2011, 18:43:57 PM »

Sorry, I didn't put those sad faces at the bottom, they just appeared.
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grampron
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« Reply #142 on: February 28, 2011, 18:40:41 PM »

Sailors Adrift: The Lingering Tragedy of Agent Orange
Posted on June 27, 2010 by Veterans' Voices
Sailors suffer illness, disability as VA denies Agent Orange benefits to an entire class of Vietnam veterans
By Ken Olsen
(Copyright 2010 / All Rights Reserved)
Bombs are loaded onto planes aboard USS Bon Homme Richard off Vietnam in 1965. Sailors claim they, too, were exposed to Agent Orange. Photo by Kyoichi Sawada/Corbis
Robert Ross heard the low-flying plane heading his direction as he stood on the signal bridge of USS Vega on a late-summer day in 1966. Bathed in Southeast Asian sunshine, he was listening to Frankie Valli & The Four Seasons when he looked up just in time to get a face full of spray.
?The officer on deck was panicking,? Ross recalls. ?They hollered, ?Everybody inside! Agent Orange!? But it was too late.?
Forty-three years later, time is running out for Ross and tens of thousands of other sailors suffering from various cancers, Parkinson?s disease, diabetes and heart conditions caused by Agent Orange exposure during the Vietnam War. For nearly a decade, VA, acting on a
Bush administration directive and a punitive court decision, has severed their benefits or denied their claims. Under these new VA rules, so-called ?Blue Water? and ?Blue Sky? veterans are deemed not to have suffered any ill effects from the millions of gallons of toxic defoliant spread across the jungles during the war, regardless of any contact they may have had with it. The government?s rationale: they did not set foot on land or couldn?t meet VA?s stringent requirements for proof that they were exposed.
?VA acts as if there is an invisible shield at the shoreline,? says David Greenberg, a Navy veteran. ?In reality, Agent Orange blew out over the ocean. It also fell into the rivers and streams that fed out into the ocean. (And) because Navy ships distilled Agent Orange-tainted seawater for cooking, drinking and showering, it?s incomprehensible for VA to deny we were exposed.?
Denise Ross, whose husband is fighting for benefits, calls VA?s treatment of Agent Orange veterans disgraceful. ?They have lost everything. They have no way to support themselves. They are dying at an incredible rate. And VA treats them as if they are lying.?
Their last hope: legislation backed by The American Legion and other veterans groups that would restore the Agent Orange benefits Congress first authorized in 1991 for everyone who served in the Vietnam War ? on land, in the air or at sea.
Operation Ranch Hand
The U.S. military sprayed 20 million gallons of the deadly dioxin-based herbicide in Vietnam and Laos to strip the dense jungle that gave the enemy cover, to destroy their crops, and to clear ground for U.S. fire bases.Operation Ranch Hand ran from the early 1960s to the early 1970s.
VA still required proof of exposure, beginning in the 1970s when veterans first raised concerns about their own strange illnesses and birth defects among their children, says Bart Stichman, joint executive director of the National Veterans Legal Services Program, which has represented Agent Orange victims since the 1970s.
VA conceded that chloracne, skin lesions caused by chemical exposure, was connected to Agent Orange exposure in 1978. And in 1984, Congress ordered VA to assemble a committee of scientists to study whether the list of illnesses presumed to be caused by Agent Orange should be expanded.
A responded by handpicking scientists, some of whom had worked for chemical companies that manufactured Agent Orange, Stichman says. In essence, ?they denied everybody,? Stichman says.
By then, there were 800 studies on dioxin, the key toxin in Agent Orange. VA?s committee ?reviewed a couple dozen studies? in 10 months, Stichman says. His group sued, and a federal court in California ordered VA to start over.
Meanwhile, Dow, Monsanto and other Agent Orange manufacturers settled a class-action lawsuit with veterans. The $180 million settlement didn?t go far but was important in making the case for health problems the herbicide inflicted.
Congressional Reprieve
By 1990, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention concluded that the 3 million veterans who served in Vietnam suffered a 50-percent-higher rate of non‑Hodgkin?s lymphoma than veterans who didn?t serve in Southeast Asia. VA then added that lone cancer to a short list of Agent Orange illnesses it would cover.
Realizing VA would never go far enough, Congress passed the Agent Orange Act of 1991. The legislation made it clear that anyone who served in the war ? whether on land or in Vietnam?s territorial waters ? was presumed to have been exposed and should receive VA benefits for illnesses caused by it. It also called for the National Academy of Sciences to determine which diseases were connected to Agent Orange. Over the next decade, soft-tissue sarcoma, lung, trachea and larynx cancer, multiple myleoma, Type 2 diabetes and other diseases were added to the list of Agent Orange conditions VA would cover.
Meanwhile, the Royal Australian Navy discovered that running dioxin-tainted seawater through its ships? distilling machines ? identical to equipment the U.S. Navy used to supply cooking, drinking and bathing water to ships in Vietnam ? magnified the dioxin?s strength,
Stichman says. A study by the Institute of Medicine, an arm of the National Academies of Science, later confirmed that.
The fortunes of Blue Water veterans changed after George W. Bush became president. In 2002, VA quietly rewrote its rules to require that all veterans prove they had physically set foot in Vietnam ? known as ?boots on ground? ? to qualify for Agent Orange benefits.
?They didn?t go through formal rule-making,? Stichman says. VA started denying new claims and cutting off Blue Water veterans who previously had been receiving benefits. This occurred even though a greater percentage of Vietnam War sailors developed non-Hodgkin?s lymphoma than those who served with ground forces.
?So a guy who gets benefits from 1996 to 2002 for trachea cancer found his benefits severed,? Stichman explains. The sole exception was veterans with non-Hodgkin?s lymphoma.
Haas? Legal Voyage
Jonathan L. Haas thought he had legal grounds to challenge VA?s sudden exclusion of some 500,000 Vietnam War sailors who became known as the Blue Water veterans. He remembered clouds of Agent Orange drifting from the shore and engulfing his ammunition tender, the Mount Katmai. Forty years later, he filed an Agent Orange claim for diabetes and kidney problems.
Haas fought all the way to the Supreme Court, with the help of the National Veterans Legal
Services Program and a friend-of-the-court brief from The American Legion. He lost. And when the high court refused to hear Haas v. Nicholson in early 2009, it effectively affirmed VA?s right to rewrite the rules and prevent Blue Water veterans from receiving Agent Orange benefits.
The Bush administration also pushed for legislation prohibiting Blue Water veterans from qualifying for presumptive Agent Orange exposure. The effort failed. But the Haas decision prevented tens of thousands of sick and disabled Blue Water veterans from getting VA benefits, including Thomas J. Laliberte, a naval photographer who serviced aerial reconnaissance cameras on the A‑5 Vigilantes that flew from USS Constellation in the Gulf of Tonkin.
The airplanes flew in areas recently sprayed with Agent Orange and periodically landed in Vietnam, accumulating dioxin residue, Laliberte says. He routinely worked on the airplane cameras and camera pods after these missions.
A computer programmer, truck driver and pressman since leaving the service, Laliberte says he was never sick until he was overcome with fatigue in August 2006. He couldn?t keep up at work and was laid off from his printing-plant job. Two weeks later, Laliberte was hospitalized with multiple myeloma. His kidney failure was so profound that he was ?within days of dying,? Laliberte says.
His wife divorced him five months later. Laliberte was left only with Social Security disability benefits and temporarily moved in with a friend. VA has denied his Agent Orange-exposure claim, and he?s still living in his friend?s spare room.
?I feel abandoned,? Laliberte says, his voice hoarse from the steroids he takes to calm the side effects of chemotherapy. ?I know I was there. I know I was exposed. And I feel that way not only for myself, but for the thousands of veterans who need help but can?t get the health care they need.?
Three years ago, Laliberte joined the newly formed Veterans Association of Sailors of the Vietnam War and now serves as its president. Together with The American Legion and other veteran groups, the VASVW is pushing legislation to restore veterans? Agent Orange benefits.
Rep. Bob Filner, D-Calif., chairman of the House Veterans Affairs Committee, stressed urgency before hearings he called in May. ?Congress? original intent was to provide these veterans with benefits based on their exposure to Agent Orange and other deadly herbicides ? regardless of arbitrary geographic line-drawing,? he wrote in a letter to his colleagues.
VA declined to address specific issues raised by veterans in this article. But in a statement prepared for The American Legion Magazine, VA noted it has proposed adding hairy cell leukemia, Parkinson?s disease and ischemic heart disease to the list of illnesses presumed to be connected to Agent Orange exposure, and ?is committed to pursuing all medical research efforts that improve our understanding of diseases that could be presumptively service-connected.?
Ross? Dying Wish. Nevada veteran Robert Ross wonders if he?ll outlive the VA appeals process. He developed blistering sores on his back in the 1970s and diabetes in 1995. He suffered heart failure in 2001, but is not a transplant candidate because of kidney problems. He had thyroid cancer, suffers from neuropathy, and fights an indigestion problem. Two years ago, doctors likened his life expectancy to that of a terminal-cancer patient.
Ross filed a claim with the Reno, Nev., VA in 2008. He was denied as a result of the Haas ruling. He cannot prove he took the face full of spray that late-summer day in 1966. He cannot prove he was close enough to the shore to see people?s faces. He cannot prove his ship was tied to a dock on several trips into Da Nang Harbor to re-supply U.S. ships.
?People are under the impression that these men have access to proof of where they were all of the time, of incidents that occurred while they were on ship, and every location of their ship,? Denise Ross says. ?It was wartime. A lot of that information wasn?t put in the ship?s log or written down.?
Ross filed a notice of disagreement with the Reno VA in April 2009. ?We provided them the doctor?s letter that said my husband has a year to live,? Denise says. ?I begged them. I said, ?My husband is dying. Can?t you just deny his claim so we can file an appeal?? We?re concerned about our son, who has asthma and other medical issues.?
That denial finally came this spring, a year after the Rosses? urgent plea. They will appeal this summer. The case will drag on perhaps another year ? a year Ross might not have.
The Rosses, like Laliberte, are putting their hope in the legislation.
?Every senator and member of Congress has the responsibility to step in immediately,? Denise says. ?They can?t put a stop to the suffering. But they can restore the benefits that have been denied these men. I want it made right not just for my husband, but for everyone.?
This story appeared in the July issue of The American Legion Magazine.

How much more evidence does the VA need?HuhHuhHuhHuh??
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Mark D
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« Reply #141 on: February 27, 2011, 10:36:23 AM »

Then, how do the men get in? And how do they get mail in the boats?

Rope ladders are one option - having men in the boat as it lowers (which is necessary anyway) is another. There are several ways to get men in the boat that does not require being anchored or even stopped.

It was also not unusual for mail to be delivered from another ship that was recently in port. These "high seas" transfers happened all the time, although not usually with boats.
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grampron
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« Reply #140 on: February 27, 2011, 09:43:21 AM »

Then, how do the men get in? And how do they get mail in the boats?
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Mark D
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« Reply #139 on: February 27, 2011, 09:19:47 AM »

This may sound silly to you Vietnam Vets but in order to get motor whale boat and utility into water wouldn't you have to be anchored in water?  I'm just thinking of possible excuses the VA can come up with to deny A O Exposure.

No, the ship merely needs to be stopped or going very slow. I've seen them launch the boats while underway (at less than 5 knots or so).
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grampron
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« Reply #138 on: February 27, 2011, 09:13:47 AM »

This may sound silly to you Vietnam Vets but in order to get motor whale boat and utility into water wouldn't you have to be anchored in water?  I'm just thinking of possible excuses the VA can come up with to deny A O Exposure.
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kayo1952
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« Reply #137 on: February 26, 2011, 08:07:00 AM »


Institute of Medicine Review on Possible Agent Orange Exposure

VA has asked the National Academy of Sciences Institute of Medicine (IOM) to review the medical and scientific evidence regarding Blue Water Veterans? possible exposure to Agent Orange.

A report should be completed and available by summer 2011.

IOM is evaluating:

    * Historical background of the Vietnam War comparing Blue Water Navy, ?boots on ground? combat troops, and Brown Water Navy (includes inland waters).
    * Exposure levels among Blue Water Navy relative to ground troops in Vietnam or other contemporary ground troops deployed elsewhere (?Era? Veterans).
    * Comparative exposures for troops on the ground and troops aboard ships in the context of all possible routes of exposure, including herbicide ?overspray? and consumption of contaminated water and food.
    * A wide range of potential herbicide and dioxin exposure mechanisms including potential concentrating toxics in drinking water, air exposure possibly from drift from spraying, food, soil, skin, etc.
    * Comparative risks for long-term health outcomes comparing Vietnam Veteran ground troops, Blue Water Navy Veterans, and other ?Era? Veterans serving during the Vietnam War at other locations (assuming relative herbicide and dioxin exposures can be assessed). This will be based on previous IOM Veterans and Agent Orange study conclusions*? on long-term health outcomes from herbicide exposure.
    * Existing studies of Blue Water Navy Veterans for reported health outcomes.

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grampron
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« Reply #136 on: February 25, 2011, 20:36:15 PM »

NEW AGENT ORANGE CLINIC ! ! !
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The Order of the Silver Rose has made arrangements for discounts for food and lodging
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====ADDITIONAL INFO:
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Dr. Bartel is highly experienced in screening, testing, and treating the various diseases
and conditions associated with exposure to Agent Orange and other chemicals used in
Vietnam. While he was a medical officer serving on active duty in the armed forces, Dr.
Bartel led medical studies in this area for the Department of Defense.
Many physicians, patients, and families notice the swift onset and rapid progression of
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Appointments are on a first-come, first-served basis. Call (940) 322-1075, and make an
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Servicemen, 1976-1982
2. 1982-Present: Neurologist, North Texas Neurology Associates, Wichita Falls, Texas
Education:
B.S., Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, 1973
M.D., University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, 1976
Internship, General Surgery, University of Texas Affiliated Hospitals, 1976-77
Residency, Internal Medicine, Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, 1977-78
Neurology Fellowship, Indiana University Medical Center, Indianapolis, 1978-81
EEG/Evoked Potentials/EMG, Indiana University Medical Center, Indianapolis, 1981-82
Assistant Professor of Neurology, Indiana University, 1981-82
Medical Director, Epilepsy Clinic, Indiana University, 1981-82
Assistant Professor, Family Practice, University of Texas, Dallas, 1989-present
State Licensure: Texas State Board of Medical Examiners, June 1976, License #E6226
Board Certifications:
1. American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, November 1982, #24-298
2. American Board of Clinical Neurophysiology, May 1980
Professional Associations:
American Medical Association, Fellow of American Academy of Neurology, American
Association of Electromyography and Electrodiagnostics, American EEG Society, Texas
Medical Association, Wichita County Medical Society
A published principal clinical researcher (studies, medications, treatments too numerous
to list here), see Dr. Bartel?s website at www.ntneuro.com
Appointments:
Medical Director, North Texas Neurology Research, 1998-present
Co-Medical Director, Wichita Falls Rehabilitation Hospital, 1992-1999
Medical Director, Horizon Specialty Hospital, Wichita Falls, 1996-1999
Hospital Affiliations:
United Regional Health Care System, Wichita Falls, Texas
Kell West Regional Hospital, Co-Owner
Wichita Falls Rehabilitation Hospital
Horizon Specialty Hospital
Red River Hospital
Wichita Falls State Hospital
Sheppard Regional===========================================================Hospital Clinic, Sheppard AFB, Texas
Bowie Hospital, Bowie, Texas
Seymour Hospital, Seymour, Texas

JUST FOUND THIS, HOPE IT MIGHT HELP SOMEONE
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grampron
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« Reply #135 on: February 25, 2011, 17:33:08 PM »

Dear Mr. Bell:

This is in response to your inquiry to the Department of Veterans Affairs of February 25, 2011.

We are emailing your comments to the internal VA Compensation and Pension Service Agent Orange Mailbox to start an evaluation of your ship's history in Da Nang.

Thank you for contacting us. If you have questions or need additional help with the information in our reply, please respond to this message or see our other contact information below.

Sincerely yours,

E. J. Kruse
National IRIS Response Center Manager
csw

How to Contact VA:

On line:
www.va.gov

By phone:
(800) 827-1000
(800) 829-4833 (TDD hearing impaired)

By fax:
(310) 235-6056

By letter:
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
Los Angeles VA Regional Office
Federal Building
11000 Wilshire Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90024


Let's hope this isn't a get off our back
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grampron
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« Reply #134 on: February 25, 2011, 13:36:41 PM »

Dear Mr. Bell:

This is in response to your inquiry to the Department of Veterans Affairs of February 24, 2011.

If you can document evidence why your ship should be on the list, respond to this email, with your contact information, and we'll send it to the appropriate office for verification.

Thank you for contacting us. If you have questions or need additional help with the information in our reply, please respond to this message or see our other contact information below.

Sincerely yours,

E. J. Kruse
National IRIS Response Center Manager
csw

How to Contact VA:

On line:
www.va.gov

By phone:
(800) 827-1000
(800) 829-4833 (TDD hearing impaired)

By fax:
(310) 235-6056

By letter:
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
Los Angeles VA Regional Office
Federal Building
11000 Wilshire Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90024


This is the letter I got from the VA when I asked why the USS King wasn't on AO Exposure list.
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grampron
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« Reply #133 on: February 24, 2011, 19:43:07 PM »

I text the VA.gov. and asked why the USS King dlg/10 has been in Da Nang Harbor 4 times by written accounts on Command History and the new account on Deck Logs 10/21/72 on AO Exposure List. Now I wait the 5 days for a reply.
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